Close

Presentation

Characterizing Movement Components of COVID-19 by Examining Acute Oxidative Stress Effects on the Depression of Limb Muscle Contractility
Author
Event Type
Poster Presentation
TimeThursday, April 152:00pm - 3:00pm EDT
LocationEducation and Simulation
DescriptionThe Covid-19 pandemic has devastated the global community. While much of the current research is geared towards viral pathology, scientists are also discovering that Covid-19 has an effect on movement. Persons who have had Covid-19, have been reported to suffer with sluggish feeling, muscle soreness and gait abnormalities. Owing to this, we plan to provide neuro-biomechanical feedback to aid in human movement assessments for Covid-19 patients. This will provide insight into muscle physiology deficiencies in populations who have been diagnosed with Covid-19 through comparative models with populations unaffected by Covid-19. With the use of The Homer Technique ® (THT) Kinect module and EMG sensors, we can calculate an individual’s level of fatigue based on their ability to maintain neuromuscular control of the lower extremities. This neuromuscular algorithm can further be used to help detect movement efficiency. The physical maladies described by Covid-19 patients can be detected using infrared heat mapping for skeletal muscles. Profiling healthy (non-Covid-19) blood oxygen concentration in conjunction with joint work, would give us an indication of infected individuals. We can build technology with computer vision and machine learning capabilities that would target specific muscles mostly affected through Covid-19 infection, specifically, large muscle groups used for balance, stability, gait, and sit to stand. It would not be difficult for the technology to identify and collect information using infrared sensors embedded in the computer vision software, therefore simple movement evaluations in humans who have had Covid-19 would be ideal targets for characterization. Thus, characterizing key components of neuromuscular effort as it relates to mechanical efficiency, will provide insight into muscle physiology deficiencies in populations who have been diagnosed with Covid-19 and populations unaffected by Covid-19.